ArmPull Hands Free Door Handles

Hands free door handles

for more information please call 01865 872278
info@zigzagdesignstudio.com

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

'ArmPull’ is a new and unique *hands free door handle range from Zigzag Design Studio, developed to dramatically reduce germ transmission in public places, and to offer an alternative way of door opening for the disabled, elderly and less capable, as well as in the work place. ‘ArmPull’ has been ergonomically designed by Zigzags experienced team of designers, to be intuitive and comfortable to use with your forearm or wrist, avoiding unnecessary contact with hands. ‘ArmPull’ gives users with grip and joint problems the choice to open public doors in a new way, without putting strain on hands fingers or joints. ‘ArmPull' is comfortable to use and beautiful to look at, perfect for all people in all interiors.

*ArmPull is designed to replace traditional door handles on public doors to offer an alternative way of opening, however it can also be used in the traditional way.

ArmPull ™ is Trade Marked in the UK

Find us on facebook

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

ArmPull in bronze and brass - Self cleaning, anti bacterial door handles

ArmPull is also made in bronze, brass. The surfaces of copper and its alloys, such as brass and bronze, are antimicrobial. These materials have the ability to kill a wide range of harmful germs and bacteria relatively quickly, often within two hours or less, and with a high degree of efficiency. Think of them as self cleaning. Antimicrobial copper-alloys can prevent frequently touched surfaces from serving as hot spots for the growth and spread of pathogenic microbes, especially in healthcare facilities where harmful viruses, bacteria, and fungi gather on high touch areas like door handles. These germ killing properties have been proven by an extensive body of research. Research also suggests that if touch surfaces are made using copper alloys, the lessened transmission of disease-causing organisms can reduce patient infections in hospital intensive care units by as much as 58%.